Full name: Kathy Williamson

Time Submitted: 05/01/08 04:26PM

Unit Plan

Unit Overview

Unit Title
A descriptive or creative name for your unit

Gothic Beauty - Science vs Wisdom

Unit Summary
A concise overview of your unit that includes the topics within your subject that are covered, a description of the main concepts learned, and a brief explanation for how the activities help students answer the Content, Unit, and Essential Questions
ELA 10. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Students will discover the Gothic tradition through the use of centers. Through the use of a class WIKI on our Pioneer Home Page, students will work with the following ESSENTIAL THEMES:
* Do humans have a responsibility to society while balancing their desire to expand upon or discover new knowledge?
* How can monsters teach us something about ourselves?
* Can romantic novels explore the depths of science and technology?

Through reading Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, students will learn how a character's obsessive desire to manipulate nature in the name of science end up causing tremendous harm?

Finally, students will create a multi-media presentation incorporating what they have learned from collaborative communication and through the use of self-created rubrics, present research findings on scientific advancements. In the spirit of practicing critical analysis, students will critically analyze the Science and Wisdom quote, interpret the quote, and then apply what they have learned by writing an essay utilizing literary elements.("The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom.")





Subject Area
The subject area you are specifically targeting for the unit (addressed in the standards, objectives, and instructional procedures)
ELA
Grade Level
The targeted grade level(s) for the unit
10th grade
Approximate Time Needed
Example: 8 50-minute class periods, 6 weeks, 3 months, and so forth
2 months
Unit Foundation
Targeted Content Standards and Benchmarks
Paste your standards here. After refining and reducing the list of standards for this specific unit, the resulting standards in this section should include prioritized, targeted standards that your students are expected to meet (not just lightly address) and which you will assess by the end of this unit.
Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding.
As listeners and readers, students will collect data, facts, and ideas; discover relationships, concepts,
and generalizations; and use knowledge generated from oral, written, and electronically produced
texts. As speakers and writers, they will use oral and written language to acquire, interpret, apply,
and transmit information.

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.
Students will read and listen to oral, written, and electronically produced texts and performances,
relate texts and performances to their own lives, and develop an understanding of the diverse social,
historical, and cultural dimensions the texts and performances represent. As speakers and writers,
students will use oral and written language for self-expression and artistic creation.

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.
As listeners and readers, students will analyze experiences, ideas, information, and issues presented
by others using a variety of established criteria. As speakers and writers, they will present, in oral and
written language and from a variety of perspectives, their opinions and judgments on experiences,
ideas, information and issues.

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.
Students will use oral and written language for effective social communication with a wide variety of
people. As readers and listeners, they will use the social communications of others to enrich their
understanding of people and their views.
Student Objectives/Learning Outcomes
Enter a prioritized list of content objectives that are assessed and students are expected to master by the end of your unit.
1. After reading Frankenstein, students will critically analyze the Science and Wisdom quote, interpret the quote, and then apply what they have learned by writing an essay utilizing literary elements.

2. Students will collaboratively communicate throughout the unit using Email, blogging, wiki-space, and face-to-face collaboration. Students will continually complete checklists for individual work and group work; reflect on project before/during/after unit; and assess themselves and one another.

3. Students will explore the Gothic Art Centers working in teams, utilizing multimedia to critique for information and understanding,
literary response and expression,critical analysis and evaluation, and social interaction.

{4. They will also apply what they have learned in creating their own Gothic Art form (art piece/music/video editing/creative writing/etc.)


Curriculum-Framing Questions (See Resources tab > CFQs link for more information.)
Essential Question
A broad, overarching question that can bridge several units or subject areas
Do humans have a responsibility to society while balancing their desire to expand upon or discover new knowledge?

Unit Questions
Guiding questions for your unit
How can a character's obsessive desire to manipulate nature in the name of technological advancement cause tremendous harm?

How can monsters teach us something about ourselves?

Can romantic novels explore the depths of science and technology?

Content Questions
Content area or definitional questions
Is Victor Frankenstein obsessed with chemistry and the scientific inquiry of creating LIFE?

Does Frankenstein have Godlike aspirations to create a superhuman?

Does the occult drive Frankenstein insane or does Frankenstein's motivation to create life drive him insane?

Does Aylmer from Hawthorne's "The Birthmark" get obsessed with perfection?

Does Aylmer have Godlike aspirations to make his wife perfect?

Does occult philosophies make people go insane?

Discussion Questions or Journal Response Questions at end of unit:
1. What force of nature did Dr. Frankenstein use to give life to his creation?
2. Why do you think Dr. Frankenstein did not want to destroy his creation after the monster killed his assistant, even though everyone urged him to do so?
3. Why did the monster begin killing everyone with whom he came in contact?
4. As the story progresses, what do you see happening to the control Dr. Frankenstein and others have over the monster?
5. Why do you think so many scientists are portrayed as being mad (crazy) in literature and in films?
6. Do you think artificial life forms should be created? Why or why not?
7. Should scientists and inventors be held accountable for applications to which their
discoveries are put, even if those applications are unforeseen and unintended? Give an example of a discovery or invention whose application has had grave consequences.
8. What do you think might be a positive use for a biotechnologically engineered,
artificially intelligent life form? To what negative application might this engineered life form be used? Who or what would be the policing agency to see that any negative applications would not occur?
9. Why is Frankenstein considered a horror story?
10. When completed in 1931, the original movie was call the "Greatest Science Fiction
Thriller Ever Made." Do you think this science fiction of the 1930's could become science fact today?
Assessment Plan
Assessment Timeline
Before project work begins
Enter assessments that help determine a student's background, skills, attitude, and misconceptions
Students work on projects and complete tasks
Enter assessments that gauge student needs, monitor progress, check for understanding, and encourage metacognition, self-direction, and collaboration
After project work is completed
Enter assessments that assess students' understanding and skills, encourage metacognition, and gauge student needs for future instruction
* Survey students in having them list every technological advancement that they can, prioritize the list, rank top 10, describe why.

* Student groups explore various art pieces, architecture, music, movies, and videos, relating to Goth and/or the Occult.

* Students will look at Project Plan Presentation "Devine or Design"

*Students will help design Presentation Rubric
* Students conduct research portion of presentation.

* Students participate in on-line blogging and class Wiki

* Students conduct external research with surveying science students in other classes.

* Students will revisit learning plans for presentation by collaborative communication and self-checklist completion

* Students will have the final rubrics for their multimedia project, including their self assessment, group scoring rubric, presentation skills rubric, and overall graded rubric for the project

*Reading Response Journals

* Gothic Poetry Perspectives Rubrics
* Critical Lens Essay from Science and Wisdom Quote with scoring rubric

* Final Journal Response on Wiki Discussion tab

* Multimedia Presentation Rubric
(created by class)

* Manilla Folder Schema (k-w-learned) incorporating Revised Ranking of Technological Advancements
Assessment Summary
Describe the assessments that you and your students use to gauge needs, set goals, monitor progress, provide feedback, assess thinking and processes, and reflect on learning throughout the learning cycle. These might include graphic organizers, journal prompts, anecdotal notes, checklists, conferences, questioning, and rubrics. Also describe the artifacts of student learning that you assess, such as products, presentations, written documents, or performances and the assessments you use. Describe in the Instructional Procedures section who uses the assessments, how they are used, and where they occur.
Unit Details
Prerequisite Skills
Conceptual knowledge and technical skills that students must have to begin this unit
Students will need to be able to recognize:

*The difference between natural design and scientific/technological advances.
*The difference between knowledge and wisdom
*Understand what Gothic Culture is and is not
*Appreciate the arts (culture/clothing/music/paintings/architecture/movies..)
Instructional Procedures
A clear picture of the instructional cycle—a description of the scope and sequence of student activities and an explanation for how students are involved in planning their own learning
Unit Summary:
After starting a unit on Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, students study current topics of scientific research and consider potential social, ethical and economic implications for the world at large. Students form collaborative teams and select an area of technological research to investigate. They collect information summarizing current research and issues related to their topic and information on possible effects this area of research could have on mankind. Students represent informed experts who present their findings to their fellow science council members, taking a point of view about the risk or benefit of the research endeavor.

Students will design their own presentation rubrics for themselves and for their group as a whole.

Accommodations for Differentiated Instruction
Resource Student
Describe accommodations and support for students, such as extra time for study, adjusted learning objectives, modified assignments, grouping, assignment calendars, adaptive technologies, and support from specialists. Also describe modifications in how students express their learning (for example, oral interview instead of a written test).
Extra time for assessments, simplified learning objectives, modified assignments, grouping, assignment calendars, adaptive technologies, and support from specialists.
Nonnative English Speaker
Describe language support, such as English Language Learner (ELL) instruction and tutoring from more able bilingual students or community volunteers. Describe adaptive materials, such as first-language texts, graphic organizers, illustrated texts, dual-language dictionaries, and translation tools. Describe modifications in how students express their learning, such as first language rather than English or an oral interview instead of a written test.
Gifted Student
Describe the various ways students may explore curriculum content, including independent study, and various options through which students can demonstrate or exhibit what they have learned, such as more challenging tasks, extensions that require in-depth coverage, extended investigation in related topics of the learner's choice, and open-ended tasks or projects.
They will also apply what they have learned in creating their own Gothic Art form (art piece/music/video editing/creative writing/etc.)
Materials and Resources Required for Unit
Technology—Hardware: List all required hardware and where it is needed
Computer(s)
DVD Player
Internet Connection
Projection System
Scanner

Other
Technology—Software: List all required hardware and where it is needed
E-mail Software
Internet Web Browser
Multimedia
Web Page Development
Word Processing

Other
Printed Materials
Textbooks, curriculum guides, story books, lab manuals, reference materials, and so forth.
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Frankenstein student guide packets
Supplies
Essential items that have to be ordered or gathered to implement your unit and are specific to the course of study. Do not include everyday items that are common to all classrooms
Internet Resources
Web addresses (URLs) that support the implementation of your unit
Other Resources
Field trips, experiments, guest speakers, mentors, other students/classrooms, community members, parents, and so forth


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